Great Training Experiences

I sat in a hotel conference center where I didn’t want to be, in a room full of people I didn’t really know or care about, and a facilitator told me to look at the person to my left and tell him about a current issue at work I needed to resolve. I didn’t want to do it. The person to my left was annoying and all to happy to accommodate the facilitator. I was grumpy when I told him about my issue, and what happened next forever changed my ideas on training.

Heather Snyder training

That day I learned that training is not only about lecture and rigorous note taking. For the very first time I learned that Continue reading

7 Gifts for that Special Presenter in your Life

As the Christmas season descends upon us and you stress out over that perfect gift for that special presenter in your life, I’m here to help you with a variety of ideas at various price points. I’ve intentionally kept each of these gifts relatively small in size because presenters are constantly traveling and need things that are easy to cart around – whether simply moving from their desk to a conference room, or perhaps they’ll need to pack these things in a carry-on and haul it across the country or around the world.   Continue reading

Structuring a Training Story

stories in books

Storytelling in training is an effective way to relay facts and give your participant the information they need in a context they can understand. Unfortunately, crafting a story that resonates with participants isn’t always easy.

Stories need structure, something that keeps participants involved until the end. To make storytelling a bit easier, I pulled together the framework I generally use when creating a story. This simple formula aims to help you build a good story without giving too much information away too soon. Continue reading

Help Wanted: Ultra-creative Elearning Designer/Developer

103 years ago tomorrow – On December 5, 1914 – a ship named Endurance set out from a whaling station on South Georgia Island to Antarctica with 28 men, a bunch of sled dogs and supplies enough to be the first ever party to cross Antarctica by land. The group was led by an explorer named Sir Ernest Shackleton and this was considered one of the greatest stories of adventure and survival in the 20th century.

In December 2012, two entrepreneurs with L&D backgrounds sat in a diner in the Adams Morgan neighborhood of Washington, DC and kicked around an idea for their own great adventure of sorts – how to transform the way learning happens in training rooms across the country.

Inspired by Sir Ernest Shackleton’s adventurous spirit, a company named Endurance Learning was born.

Legend holds that Shackleton took out an ad in a newspaper that read: “Men wanted for hazardous journey. Low wages, bitter cold, long hours of complete darkness. Safe return doubtful. Honour and recognition in event of success.” That was it. A simple job description.

This December, Endurance Learning is growing. Again taking inspiration from Shackleton, Endurance Learning is searching for an amazing, effective elearning designer/developer and here are the details:

Schackleton_eLearningDev

If you think you fit this description, we’d love to hear from you. If you think you know someone who might be ready to accept this challenge and go on an adventure with us as we change how learning is done, ensuring that every presentation is engaging and leads to change, then we’d love if you could pass this along.

If the blog hasn’t told you enough about who we are, you can also take a look at the Endurance Learning About Us page.

If you have questions or want to share your resume, email us at shackleton@endurancelearning.com.

Let’s adventure together!

Standards of Writing Instructions

I was working on some home repairs over the weekend when I found myself in need of a product I had never used. Wanting to use it correctly, I read the instructions, and then I read them again. I then proceeded to read them aloud to my husband. As I did, I read each quote, bold, or numbered step as though I was an instructor at the front of the room teaching someone how to use the material. I recommend this if you are ever in need of a laugh. Here is an example of what I read:

Warning

This sentence fills me with questions. Is that really a warning? Why is warning bolded? What is “it” and why is it in quotation marks? Continue reading

9 tips for better flip charts

While PowerPoint often dominates the visual scene during presentations and training sessions, flip charts are ever-present. A well-designed flip chart can add an important visual element to the session.

One of the many advantages that flip charting holds over PowerPoint is that when a slide is advanced, it’s gone… but your flip charts can hang on the wall for as long as you need them to!

Here are 9 ideas to up your flip chart game Continue reading