What’s on the horizon for L&D according to Andrew Scivally

Over the past two years, ELB Learning (formerly eLearning Brothers) has acquired 6 companies and, as you can see, has changed its name from eLearning Brothers to ELB Learning.

Last week I had a chance to sit down with the co-founder and CEO, Andrew Scivally, about the path that led him to start eLearning Brothers (alongside his brother), the evolution of the field of learning and development that led to the company’s name change, and his thoughts on the challenges that L&D professionals will need to be prepared to face over the next few years.

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L&D Lessons Learned from Being a Parent (Part 3 of 5)

Poop

I am not sure I can write a mini blog series on lessons I’ve learned in parenting without including a poop story, can I? But don’t worry, thankfully, this blog comes sans smells, and I will leave out most of the gory details.

When our youngest was two months old, we traveled as a family to Southern California for vacation. The trip unfortunately coincided with some constipation for our little one. With little babies, this isn’t necessarily uncommon. However, most caregivers know that after a poop hiatus, when it comes, it’s likely to be EPIC… so we were on high alert.

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When creating eLearning, these five differences between ILT and eLearning can be helpful to keep in mind

I’ve had a chance to work with a number of people who have a background in classroom facilitation or k-12 education, but who are just starting out in their journey as eLearning designers.

In today’s podcast, I walk through five big differences between instructor-led training and eLearning, and I also offer a few ways to navigate, and in some cases take advantage of, these differences when creating eLearning experiences.

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L&D Lessons Learned from Being a Parent (Part 2 of 5)

Surprise and Delight

Very recently, I took a long weekend trip to visit my best friend from college. This was the first time I have traveled alone in a long time. No kids, no strollers, no diapers. Heaven.

I was very surprised when my bag got searched at security. But when the TSA Agent pulled a full 16 ounce waterbottle out of a crumpled brown paper bag marked “For Mom”, we both laughed. Much to my surprise, my middle kiddo had packed me a “care package” that included travel-sized hand sanitizer, two bandaids, a rubber band, a sticker, and a full water bottle.

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What happens when training and marketing collaborate?

A month and a half ago, I was sitting in a training session when someone from the marketing department got in front of the room. She shared how she worked with the training team to help follow up training events with communication and additional resources for training participants.

Recently I asked this marketing professional to sit down and help me better understand how she works with the training team, and what’s in it for both the training and marketing teams. Here is what Emily Ledbetter had to say.

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L&D Lessons Learned from Being a Parent (Part 1 of 5)

My colleague Erin Clarke joined our team at Endurance Learning last year. Every once in a while when we’re talking in a meeting or a 1:1, she’ll mention something about her experience as a parent and I’ll respond: Wow, that’s true in parenting and in instructional design!

Over the next few weeks, Erin will be sharing a series of posts that offer some transferable lessons she’s learned by being a parent that can also be used in the world of learning and development or instructional design. Some topics Erin will touch on include:

  • Surprise and delight
  • Poop
  • “I do it!”
  • Try something new

For today, however, Erin begins with a lesson on how context can be everything.

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Who do you lean on for L&D support?

A year or so ago, my friend and colleague, Kassy LaBorie, invited me to join a group of fellow trainers and training designers for their monthly, virtual chit chats. Over the past year, as part of this group, I’ve met an incredible group of people, passionate about their craft and always willing to lend a helping hand.

Some of us work in larger training teams, some of us are “teams of one”, but we all need support, advice and a helping hand from time to time. In today’s podcast, I brought in some different voices from our monthly, virtual training group to share what they find valuable about our meet-ups, and what you might want to consider if you’re thinking of pulling a group of people together.

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Training Design Lessons from a Spy Museum

Last week I was in New York City with some of my family for spring break. Perhaps the most surprising highlight was an impromptu visit to Spyscape, a spy museum near Times Square. While it was a very cool museum for a tourist like me, I was also fascinated by how engaged every single visitor to the museum seemed to be. The instructional designer in me couldn’t help but to take notice.

Here are three instructional design thoughts I had after walking through the museum and seeing hyper-engaged visitors everywhere I turned.

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Know something? Say something!

I’d bet a gazillion dollars that every single person who is reading today’s blog post has something they could share with the rest of the world that would help other people do something new or differently or better.

I also bet that a few people who are reading this today have written a blog post or presented at a conference. A huge thank you to those who have. That’s a big way of how I’ve gotten to where I am today. I began just reading TD magazine cover to cover every month.

In today’s podcast, I share some thoughts about what may make for good content to share, why you might want to share it even if you don’t think anyone else would be interested, and where you might be able to share your thoughts, ideas, discoveries and practices.

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Is “understand” really a 4-letter word?

When I was first learning how to write learning objectives, I was instructed that I should be very careful about the verbs I choose, especially verbs such as “know”, “understand” or “recognize”.

The thought process behind this warning is simple. When we create learning objectives, we’re not just putting words on paper. We’re outlining what our learners should be able to do, and if we’re holding up our end of the bargain as trainers, then we should be able to observe people doing whatever we said we wanted them to do in those learning objectives.

When we use words like “know” or “understand” or “recognize”, how can we actually observe those things happening since those happen mostly inside someone else’s head? Therefore, avoid those kinds of verbs and choose something more observable.

I would still say that’s 100% correct*. (With an asterisk.)

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