How can you meet your professional goals?

Before the holidays, the Endurance Learning team shared our one-word resolutions. A recent New York Times article claims that 25% of resolutions will be abandoned by January 8th, and by the year-end, less than 10% of resolutions are fully kept. With that in mind, it is important to talk about how you execute on resolutions, and more specifically how you can meet your professional goals.

As with any growth, it is fairly unlikely that any resolution can be executed without a plan. As we embark on this new year, we must follow a plan to achieve our goals. Continue reading

Instructional Design Dilemma: Knowing When To Let Go

Let Go

Last Thursday we published a transcript of a conversation our team had about game design. One theme from that post is the idea of letting go of something that you poured your heart and soul into.

I love my job, and that shows in how much I love what we produce. As a result of this passion, I often find myself emotionally connected with what we produce and I have a sense of pride when I feel we accomplished what we set off to achieve. I am not a perfectionist, but I do like putting out good work. Continue reading

Something about old dogs and new tricks

Old Dogs New Tricks

At the beginning of June, I led a train the trainer program with a customer.

The other day, this customer sent a note that included these comments:

Brian and Tim, without question, completely changed our paradigm with their How Adults Learn training. These are the most critically important principles that I’ve learned in my 25 years of teaching, training, and developing leaders. Additionally, their instructions on how to facilitate training as opposed to delivering information was one of the greatest “Aha!” moments of my professional life.

It was high praise, and it got me wondering. I’ve spent much of my adult life developing habits and ways of doing things… when was the last time I chose to change any of those habits, especially in my professional life? How about you?  Continue reading

Trainer’s Tip: Calming the Mind, Focusing Learner’s Attention

Last week I had the opportunity to attend the Association for Talent Development Puget Sound (ATDps) chapter’s annual workplace learning conference. As soon as I walked into the room for the general session, I noticed something a little different.

On each table there was a container withcolored pencils, and sprinkled across the tables were various postcard-sized coloring pages. Adult coloring books are kind of “in” these days, and I thought this was a novel alternative to table toys or other objects typically put on tables to give people something to do while listening to speakers.

Continue reading

How do you get the most out of your conference experience?

FocusOn

This week I’m headed to Austin, TX, to participate in the eLearning Guild’s FocusOn Learning conference. Attending any conference can be a significant investment – either for your organization or, if you’re footing your own bill for professional development opportunities, then it’s a significant investment for yourself.

For example: without any discounts, the FocusOn conference registration is $1,695. Add a couple hundred dollars for the hotel, a couple hundred more dollars for airfare, some more money for meals, local transportation and other expenses, and this could easily run several thousand dollars. That’s before you factor in the cost of your own time.

What’s the best way to ensure there’s some sort of return on this investment? Continue reading

Infographic: Corporate Training Waste

Would you get upset if you spent $1,000 on a watch that didn’t work? How about spending $40,000 on a car that didn’t run?

Would you be upset if you spent $97.5 billion on something that was never really used?

I’m not sure why corporate training waste is so widely accepted and corporations around the world are willing to spend that much without getting anything in return for that investment… or why they don’t seem to get too upset about it.

You can also check out a case study about using data to defeat corporate training waste.

Corporate Training Waste Infographic

As you can see from the following infographic about corporate training waste, there are some… er… issues with the way learning and development is being conducted.

Corporate Training Waste Inforgraphic

Facts about Corporate Training Waste:

  1. A lot of money is being spent → Worldwide, companies spent $130 billion on corporate training.
  2. Not much happens as a result of that investment → Only 25% of training programs measurably improve business performance.
  3. We aren’t built for lecture → Humans forget 40% of what they’ve learned after 20 minutes and 60% after just 6 hours.
  4. L&D (Learning & Development) is not a good messenger → Only 5% of respondents reported that they are influenced by a learning & development department in order to access online materials.
  5. Terrible, painful design → 1 out of 3 employees say that “uninspiring content” is a barrier to learning.

What to do about Corporate Training Waste:

  1. Better visual experience → Students who view slides with a title, vivid imagery, and no bullet points exert less mental effort during a presentation testing than students who viewed traditional bullet point-laden slides.
  2. Supervisors must be engaged (or don’t bother) → Actions by an employee’s supervisor before and after a training event are the most essential factors as to whether an employee ever uses what she was trained on.
  3. What’s the rush?  → Surgeons retained information better and had better surgical outcomes when they learned content over the space of several weeks compared to surgeons exposed to the same content crammed into a daylong workshop.
  4. Find the motivation  → 76% of learners will complete a training course if it’ll help them do their jobs better and faster.
  5. Before spending all that money  → 86% of “Top Deck” organizations complete and report on all pilot projects before implementing major initiatives (compared to 43% of all organizations).

Is there a bright side?

On the bright side, there are some clear steps that can be taken – indeed, that organizations should insist on – in order to increase the effectiveness of corporate training and reduce corporate training waste.

These five solutions are based on research and self-reported surveys. Have you tried anything on here? How has it gone for you?

What’s missing? What other solutions are available to transform learning programs into a results-driven, effective investment for organizations? How are you preventing corporate training waste?


Want more information on possible solutions? Try:

Including Remote Staff in your Next Training Session

Max Headroom

A month and a half ago, we had a high profile speaker come to our headquarters and some of our remote staff wanted to be included in her training presentation. We set them up in Adobe Connect, we turned on the web cam in the conference room, we projected the remote staff on the screens in the front of the room (so we wouldn’t forget about them), and then… we forgot about them.

They were seen, but not really heard, during the presentation.

We struggle to include remote staff in our meetings and training sessions. Have you had similar problems?

Recently I was involved in a training program and the organization that hosted the event may have stumbled upon a better way to include remote staff.   Continue reading

L&D lessons from… a photobooth?

Photobooth

Last weekend I attended a fundraiser and near the entrance was a photobooth. And there was a long line to wait in order to get pictures.

It seems photobooths are en vogue these days – at wedding receptions, birthday parties, church gatherings, office holiday parties. Inside the photobooth, children and adults alike giggle, make funny faces, wear silly hats. The photobooth is an instant icebreaker for some, a must-do destination for others.

On the other hand, there’s training. I can’t say people line up for most training courses. There’s not much giggling or enjoyment that comes out of the training room.

Are there lessons that the photobooth can teach L&D professionals? Continue reading

Book Review: Disruptive Learning: Discover Your Inner Learning Rebel

Disruptive Learning

80-word Summary: Whether you’re looking to put together a strategy on how to address learning gaps or if you’re looking for specific strategies to engage your learners in the classroom, Disruptive Learning has a little bit of everything. There are a lot of books out there offering ideas on traditional ways to improve training efforts. This book, which is mostly a collection of Shannon Tipton’s blog posts from the past several years, challenges traditional notions and encourages readers to think a little differently.

The Details:

  • Author: Shannon Tipton
  • Price: $5.99 on Amazon
  • Pages: Depends on the size of your e-reader screen (it’s available only as an ebook)… but it’s pretty short

Bright Spots:

  • If you’re like me and just can’t keep up with all the amazing blog posts that so many different high quality writers are putting out there every week, then this book offers a series of Shannon’s best posts (updated and modified to better fit the book format) all in one place.
  • From the beginning, this book is a bit different – not starting with strategies or tips on how to engage learners or feel more comfortable speaking in front of an audience, but rather it’s a holistic look at how learning programs should be developed.
  • “Feed Your Curiosity” components toward the end of each chapter provide links to a variety of other thought leaders who wrote in more depth about the topics in Shannon’s book.
  • Who doesn’t like well-placed Star Wars and Star Trek references?

Who Should Buy It:

  • I’m not sure this is for the part-time trainer or a casual presenter. This book may be for someone new to the field of learning and development as long as they’re open to doing something their employers may or may not like. This book really seems like it’s written for readers who are willing to make some waves when it comes to designing and delivering learning initiatives. This book isn’t just about training (Shannon makes the point that training is just one element of a more comprehensive learning initiative), it’s about finding ways to make investments in learning pay off. If your organization or client expects you to deliver training to solve performance problems, this book probably isn’t for you. If you’re willing to do some things that might get you in a bit of trouble, tell people who request training some things they may not want to hear (“What do you mean this issue won’t be fixed after a half-day training?”), Disruptive Learning will offer you some important things to keep in mind as you lay out your future learning initiatives.

Crafting an Online Learning Strategy

Online Learning

Over the past several weeks, I’ve been involved in a number of conversations with a variety of organizations about overall learning strategies, and the role that online learning should play in a more comprehensive strategy. Following are my thoughts on components that need to be considered when developing a more comprehensive strategy for online learning: Continue reading