Greetings from Learning Solutions

Hello from the eLearning Guild Learning Solutions in Orlando Florida!

I have been here for a few days, and it has been time extremely well spent. Below, I posted a few videos of my time here. It is difficult to capture the entirety of the conference with a phone, but you will see the highlights.

Learning Solutions Day One

I hit my goal of not skipping sessions on day one. The sessions I found most applicable are:

  1. Seven design principles of Van Gogh.  We learned to apply Van Gogh’s artistic principles to our training design. I will be applying these principles to my instructional design in the future which mostly consisted of using what you have and implementing social-alone learning – which is social learning combined with independent learning.
  2. The “bring your own device” session for low-cost augmented reality. The facilitators demonstrated three low-cost AR software and walked us through one called Zapper. I am excited to play more with Zapper back at the office and apply it to projects.

I recommend always attending the social events. I had a 12-hour day on Tuesday and very little motivation to go socialize. With a little encouragement, I went to the evening reception and met a lot of great people. After the reception, the Guild held a game night they called Game Crawl where you could sample games and socialize with peers. One of the Guild employees, Dave, even brought a game he developed with his son for us to test.

Learning Solutions Day Two

Day two was great! The sessions that resonated with me the most involved:

  1. A panel discussion on running virtual-instructor led training (VILT) that really put into perspective the realities of a distracted world and how to manage a virtual classroom. I found this useful for VILT facilitation I will do as well as writing courses for VILT.
  2. A graphic design course for non-graphic designers that where we looked at layout, fonts, colors, and basics for IDs who find themselves struggling to make something pretty. It was simple and I see a lot of application for slide design in the future.

If there is a good reason to skip a keynote, I can’t think of it. Both Learning Solutions keynote speakers were phenomenal. I hadn’t heard of either speaker before this week, and now, I will never forget Kai Kight or Platon. I was moved to tears in the morning’s presentation as were nearly everyone in the crowd.

I am off to finish the conference. Do you have questions or advice about speaking at or attending Learning Solutions or any other conference? Let’s talk about it in the chat!

Get the Most Out of a Training Conference

The menus on conference web pages often have a tab that leads you to information on how to convince your boss to send you to their conference. I have never had to sell the value of a training conference to my superiors, but I do understand that it is important to get as much out of these very expensive experiences.

Goal Setting for Training Conferences

Learning Solutions is coming in a few short weeks, and as I finish preparations for my session on Harnessing the Power of the Narrative, I am working to focus my goals in attending this training conference. As a first-timer at Learning Solutions, I want to dive in with a clear set of objectives. Continue reading

How can you meet your professional goals?

Before the holidays, the Endurance Learning team shared our one-word resolutions. A recent New York Times article claims that 25% of resolutions will be abandoned by January 8th, and by the year-end, less than 10% of resolutions are fully kept. With that in mind, it is important to talk about how you execute on resolutions, and more specifically how you can meet your professional goals.

As with any growth, it is fairly unlikely that any resolution can be executed without a plan. As we embark on this new year, we must follow a plan to achieve our goals. Continue reading

Here’s what I learned from trying Pecha Kucha

I’ve written about Pecha Kucha-style presentations before (Pecha Kucha: PowerPoint presentations as performance art! and Want to be creative in your next presentation? Try Pecha Kucha-style!), but I’d never actually put one together until last week.

What is Pecha Kucha?

Pecha Kucha-style presentations are tightly structured presentations that require you to present on your topic using exactly 20 slides, each slide lasting only 20 seconds. The slides are generally set to auto-advance. The entire presentation is six minutes and forty seconds.

Pecha Kucha Lessons Learned

I had an opportunity to serve as the emcee at this year’s ATD Puget Sound Chapter annual workplace learning conference. One of the breakout presentations was on the topic of Pecha Kucha-style presentations and, in the spirit of showing participants one potential way to apply what was learned during the day, I thought it would be fun to issue a closing call-to-action using the Pecha Kucha format.

Here is a video of my presentation, and a few lessons Continue reading

Crowdsourcing Training Trivia

Crowd Sourcing

This coming Thursday I’ll be serving as the emcee for the Association of Talent Development Puget Sound (ATDps) chapter’s annual conference. As I was talking over this opportunity with a colleague, she asked what I’d be doing to engage the audience from the beginning.

One idea that came to me is that we could get the audience engaged before the session even begins. This is where, dear reader, I need some help from you today.   Continue reading

Learning to Give Constructive Feedback

It is nearly impossible to have any personal or professional growth without feedback.  Unfortunately, most people give and receive feedback poorly. How do we experience growth if we are not given useful, constructive feedback about what we do well and areas we can improve? Continue reading

Trainer’s Fishbowl: An Inside Look at a Pilot Program that Didn’t Hit the Mark

Fishbowl

This week we had an opportunity to pilot a training program that we’ve been working on for the past two months. We were excited to unveil it before a pilot audience, especially because we had an opportunity to incorporate a board game into the module.

At the end of the pilot session, we realized that we didn’t quite hit the mark in our first draft. Yesterday, the Endurance Learning leadership team came together via Slack to debrief the experience.

Today’s post is a sort of “fish bowl”, an opportunity to take a look into the conversation that took place as we de-briefed this session.   Continue reading

Want to be better in your L&D craft? Get involved outside of your organization.

I have a lot of coffee – both in-person and virtual – with L&D professionals and there’s one question that always comes up: how did you get to where you are?

I can safely say that I wouldn’t be where I am today without getting involved in self-initiated professional development on projects and activities outside of my own organization. I can also say that too few other L&D professionals look beyond their own organizations to get involved, and therefore hone their craft.

Here are five ways I’ve gotten involved, and how I’ve benefited from these activities: Continue reading