Ten Learning and Development Resources

As the decade closes, I would be remiss not to reflect on how my career has evolved over the last 10 years. I have been an instructional designer for the majority of this decade, thanks in no small part to the immense amount of resources available in the learning and development field. Continue reading

Comparing ILT, vILT and elearning

Last week I wrote about the strengths of elearning vs. instructor-led training (ILT). In the comment section, someone suggested that it would be interesting to see a third column in the comparison: virtual instructor-led training (vILT). I’m nothing if not a man of the people, so I’m giving them what they want.

Something I found interesting when I added the vILT column is that I couldn’t really come up with anything unique to vILT. Every item checked off for vILT is shared by either ILT or elearning. As I studied this more, I had to pause. While vILT by its nature is instructor-led and thus will obviously share some traits with ILT, it also has some things in common only with elearning.

There’s nothing in this chart to suggest that any one of these formal training methods is superior to either of the other two. It really comes down to the problem you’re looking to solve.

Need to deploy something rapidly across multiple countries and continents in multiple languages? Elearning may be your best bet.

Have an audience of learners that doesn’t have access to reliable Internet? More traditional classroom-based learning (ILT) may need to be your solution.

What’s missing from this chart when it comes to advantages of these three delivery methods? Is there anything unique to vILT that neither ILT nor elearning have? Let’s hear your thoughts in the comment section.

Conference Take-Aways

Following the 2019 Dev Learn conference, Bianca Woods put together a list of questions to put your conference learning into practice. This week, our own Brian Washburn attended the ATD Core 4 Conference in Miami as a presenter and a participant. We decided to put Bianca’s recommendations into practice and see what they look like from the eyes of a participant. I virtually sat down with Brian and asked him a few questions inspired by Bianca’s recommendations. Here is what I learned. Continue reading

Pinterest Board for Learning and Development

A few weeks ago, we looked at Pinterest boards that are worth following for learning and development. After that post, we received several requests for a curated board by our team. Since that post, we have been collecting some of our favorite pins and curating a board we think is helpful for people in the L&D world. Continue reading

Elements of Amazing Learning Experiences

If professional development experiences are a sort of lab, in which learners can test new knowledge and skills and instructional designers and trainers can concoct new and engaging ways to create amazing learning experiences, I wonder what the basic elements for this lab would be.

Being inspired as the son of a science teacher, I put together the Elements of Amazing Learning Experiences organized by solids, liquids, gases, radioactive elements and interactive elements.  Continue reading

Training Handouts: Essential to Training Design

Recently I was asked to facilitate a webinar on how to create better training handouts. I hesitated initially because I’m not a graphic designer. Then a thought struck me: graphic design may lead to prettier handouts and training manuals, but instructional design leads to more effective and engaging handouts and training manuals.

If you have 45 minutes and would like to see a recording of the webinar in its entirety, here is the link. During the session, I discussed the following five mistakes that many people make when distributing traininghandouts to participants: 

Continue reading

Making Your LMS More Valuable For Your Employees

If you’re anything like I am, you’ve tried to bring people to your LMS on several occasions, adding courses that your data suggests are needs for your organization. For all the promise that online learning holds – with its 24/7 access, no-need-to-travel-for-training – many organizations continue to struggle to bring their employees to their online learning platform.

Having worked with several organizations that have invested significantly in online learning, there seem to be three letters often missing from resources uploaded to an LMS.

Those three letters are: Continue reading

Tool Review: Screencast-O-Matic

When I have down time, I like to play around with some different tools to see if there’s anything I should be adding to my own catalog of technologies I can incorporate into my work flow.

Jane Hart’s list of Top 200 Tools for Learning is my go-to place for inspiration.

This past week I spent a lot of time talking with colleagues and potential clients about software training, specifically the importance of short, on-demand tutorials to help casual system users remember how to perform certain functions. With this in mind, I started to browse the Top 200 Tools list and came across Screencast-O-Matic. I took it for a spin and this is what I learned:   Continue reading

Greetings from Learning Solutions

Hello from the eLearning Guild Learning Solutions in Orlando Florida!

I have been here for a few days, and it has been time extremely well spent. Below, I posted a few videos of my time here. It is difficult to capture the entirety of the conference with a phone, but you will see the highlights.

Learning Solutions Day One

I hit my goal of not skipping sessions on day one. The sessions I found most applicable are:

  1. Seven design principles of Van Gogh.  We learned to apply Van Gogh’s artistic principles to our training design. I will be applying these principles to my instructional design in the future which mostly consisted of using what you have and implementing social-alone learning – which is social learning combined with independent learning.
  2. The “bring your own device” session for low-cost augmented reality. The facilitators demonstrated three low-cost AR software and walked us through one called Zapper. I am excited to play more with Zapper back at the office and apply it to projects.

I recommend always attending the social events. I had a 12-hour day on Tuesday and very little motivation to go socialize. With a little encouragement, I went to the evening reception and met a lot of great people. After the reception, the Guild held a game night they called Game Crawl where you could sample games and socialize with peers. One of the Guild employees, Dave, even brought a game he developed with his son for us to test.

Learning Solutions Day Two

Day two was great! The sessions that resonated with me the most involved:

  1. A panel discussion on running virtual-instructor led training (VILT) that really put into perspective the realities of a distracted world and how to manage a virtual classroom. I found this useful for VILT facilitation I will do as well as writing courses for VILT.
  2. A graphic design course for non-graphic designers that where we looked at layout, fonts, colors, and basics for IDs who find themselves struggling to make something pretty. It was simple and I see a lot of application for slide design in the future.

If there is a good reason to skip a keynote, I can’t think of it. Both Learning Solutions keynote speakers were phenomenal. I hadn’t heard of either speaker before this week, and now, I will never forget Kai Kight or Platon. I was moved to tears in the morning’s presentation as were nearly everyone in the crowd.

I am off to finish the conference. Do you have questions or advice about speaking at or attending Learning Solutions or any other conference? Let’s talk about it in the chat!