C4LPT’s Top 200 Tools for Learning (2018 Edition)

I don’t know where my mind has been recently, but I seem to have missed two very important release dates: Daredevil Season 3 was apparently released by Netflix a week or two ago. Perhaps more relevant to this blog, Jane Hart’s annual list of the Top 200 Tools for Learning was released in late September. You can find the list with brief descriptions of each tool here.

I get excited to review this list each year for two reasons: 1) I’m curious how the tools I use rank in popularity across the L&D community (the list was compiled after 2,951 votes were cast from 52 different countries), and 2) I love scanning the list to see if there might be some digital tools I could add to my craft in the coming year.

This year, one thing that jumped out at me was the number of “Audience Response Tools” that are available.  Continue reading

Tool Review: Screencast-O-Matic

When I have down time, I like to play around with some different tools to see if there’s anything I should be adding to my own catalog of technologies I can incorporate into my work flow.

Jane Hart’s list of Top 200 Tools for Learning is my go-to place for inspiration.

This past week I spent a lot of time talking with colleagues and potential clients about software training, specifically the importance of short, on-demand tutorials to help casual system users remember how to perform certain functions. With this in mind, I started to browse the Top 200 Tools list and came across Screencast-O-Matic. I took it for a spin and this is what I learned:   Continue reading

Brian’s Top 10 Tools for Workplace Learning

Each year, Jane Hart at the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies (C4LPT) compiles a list of the top 200 digital tools used for learning. She compiles this list by asking for people from across the world to submit the top 10 digital tools for learning that they use on a regular basis.

Below, you’ll find the 10 digital tools I’ve found most useful over the past year (in no particular order) as well as a link for more information if you’d like to submit your own list to C4LPT.   Continue reading

Looking for new training tools for your next project?

Each year Jane Hart’s Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies (C4LPT) publishes a list of the Top 200 Tools for Learning.

And each year, things like Google Search, PowerPoint and YouTube appear at the top of the list. Those aren’t surprising, but I love scrolling down the list in order to see what new training tools other people are using. I’ll inevitably stumble upon a few new technologies that I’ll incorporate into my own toolbox.

From past lists I’ve discovered new training tools like Kahoot! and PowToon, both of which I’ll still use to this day.

This year, I came across two new training technologies that seem like they could be really useful (or at least really fun) to begin playing with.  One focuses on interactive video, the other on augmented reality. Continue reading

A Series of Effective Just-in-Time Training Videos Made by an Unlikely Source

“I got an email saying that the IT department had disabled my mobile phone account. I have no idea what I did wrong.”

IT

My wife recently started a new job and earlier this week she showed up to work to find a new iPhone sitting on her desk. That evening she ripped open the box like a kid on Christmas morning and started getting it set up. She woke up the next morning to find a message from the IT department saying that her account had been disabled.

IT departments, always sticklers for superfluous stuff like network security and prevention of hacking, are just no fun. They seem to like rules. A lot. Unfortunately, most of us lay people don’t really understand these rules.

As I was making dinner later that same day I heard my wife watching something on her phone and chuckling. “Brian!” she called, “you’d appreciate these training videos.”   Continue reading

My Top 10 Tools for Learning

Last Thursday I shared the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies’ (C4LPT) 2015 list of the top 100 tools for learning.

If you want your voice heard for 2016’s top 100 list, there are several ways to do it: 1) you can vote here, 2) you can email your choices to C4LPT’s Jane Hart at jane.hart@c4lpt.co.uk, or 3) you can write a blog post about your top 10 choices.

By way of this blog post, I’m casting my votes for the 2016 list. Following are my top 10 choices (in no particular order):  Continue reading