Have you ever tried Pecha Kucha? I just did, and this is what I learned…

I’ve written about Pecha Kucha-style presentations before (here and here), but I’d never actually put one together until last week.

For those unfamiliar with Pecha Kucha-style presentations, they are tightly structured presentations that require you to present on your topic using exactly 20 slides, each slide lasting only 20 seconds. The slides are generally set to auto-advance. The entire presentation is six minutes and forty seconds.

I had an opportunity to serve as the emcee at this year’s ATD Puget Sound Chapter annual workplace learning conference. One of the breakout presentations was on the topic of Pecha Kucha-style presentations and, in the spirit of showing participants one potential way to apply what was learned during the day, I thought it would be fun to issue a closing call-to-action using the Pecha Kucha format.

Here is a video of my presentation, and a few lessons Continue reading

Crowdsourcing Training Trivia

Crowd Sourcing

This coming Thursday I’ll be serving as the emcee for the Association of Talent Development Puget Sound (ATDps) chapter’s annual conference. As I was talking over this opportunity with a colleague, she asked what I’d be doing to engage the audience from the beginning.

One idea that came to me is that we could get the audience engaged before the session even begins. This is where, dear reader, I need some help from you today.   Continue reading

Game-based Orientation (or: Why I strive to get published in a magazine even though I have my own blog)

Recently, I was fortunate enough to work alongside Miranda Greenberg and Marci Morford on one of the most creative and fun projects I’ve ever worked on in my career.

I wrote about this in a two part case study : An New Employee Orientation Overhaul and The Exciting Conclusion: What Happens When A New Hire Orientation Becomes a Game.

After speaking with Alex Moore at the Association for Talent Development, we were also given an opportunity to share a brief write-up of the project, which was published in this month’s TD magazine.

Game-based Orientation

Why should L&D professionals (or any professionals in any profession) seek to have their thoughts and perspectives and experiences and case studies published in industry publications when they could simply share these things on their own blog or website? Here are 5 reasons Continue reading

An award-winning way for L&D teams to get to know the rest of the organization

the-goblet-of-vision-in-california

“Hey! How’s your day going?”

A co-worker threw that question to me on Friday morning as I was walking to my desk for a few minutes of meeting-free respite.

“Fine,” I replied.

“Just fine?!” she asked.

“Uh. Yeah. Good. No, today is great. I guess. It’s fine. Stop badgering me.”

“We won that award!” she said.

It took a moment for that comment to register. Scanning my memory bank for a few seconds, it all came back to me. At the end of September, we had submitted an application for ATD’s Excellence in Practice award program in the category of Performance Improvement. Apparently ATD felt we had an award-worthy performance improvement initiative.    Continue reading

Why I’ve asked every trainer at my organization to attend our local ATD chapter’s annual conference

logo

I work at an eye bank. I’m surrounded by a lot of very smart people. We cure a lot of blindness. We want to cure more, so we’re growing.

As we grow and roles get more specialized, many of our departments have created technical training positions. While the people who fill those positions are among the best in the world at what they do, they’ve had very little exposure to trends and best practices in learning and professional development.   Continue reading

Case Study: Adding Training Staff Improved My Organization’s Bottom Line

On November 5, 2015, I happened to be speaking with a training colleague from another department when she began telling me the story of how she was finally able to add a .5 FTE to her training team. I asked how it was working out for her, and she began rattling off all the benefits she was seeing.

It had helped lighten her workload. She had a new partner in crime with whom she could kick ideas around. This new training person was super-high quality.

“This is exciting,” I said, “but have you seen any impact… as in anything you can quantify?”  Continue reading

A time and place to think inside the box

Have you ever wondered where the phrase “think outside the box” comes from?

After a quick search through several sources and sites, it seems to have originated from some management consultants who used the “Nine Dot Puzzle” to challenge their clients to think more creatively.

9 Dots

You will find no bigger advocate than me when it comes to the need for training professionals to be creative and innovative. But there’s a time and a place for everything. Continue reading