Crowdsourcing Training Trivia

Crowd Sourcing

This coming Thursday I’ll be serving as the emcee for the Association of Talent Development Puget Sound (ATDps) chapter’s annual conference. As I was talking over this opportunity with a colleague, she asked what I’d be doing to engage the audience from the beginning.

One idea that came to me is that we could get the audience engaged before the session even begins. This is where, dear reader, I need some help from you today.   Continue reading

Are you limited in the time you have to give a presentation? Try an Ignite-style presentation!

Hour Glass.jpg

Sometimes we have a lot of really, really important and brilliant things to say, but we’re not given much time in which to say it. There are times when we’re invited to give a 15-minute presentation in front of a coveted audience or we have a paper accepted to be presented at an academic or scientific symposium. Sometimes we’re simply asked to give a short 5-minute presentation in a staff meeting.

And there a lot of people who have mastered the art of making a short presentation feel like it will never actually end. They cram slides full of bullet points and they speak really fast and it’s mind-boggling how quickly these presentations manage to lose our attention (yet how long it seems until they wrap up)!

Instead of jamming all that information (that people won’t remember) into a presentation, why not try something a little different? An Ignite-style presentation, which (if you’re lucky) you can see every once in a while at a conference, uses the following structure:

20 slides + 15 seconds per slide (usually on auto-advance) = 5 minute presentation  Continue reading

How Bob Pike Would Help An SME Out Of A Jam

On Monday, I put out a desperate plea, seeking advice for an SME who had a tough time in the preparation and delivery of a presentation (click here to see the full post). Training legend Bob Pike read the case study and decided to weigh in on this particular situation. Following is what he suggested.

Agree? Disagree? Have other ideas? Share your thoughts in the Comments section below.

“Here are questions I would ask in order to respond to the situation:

1. How many in the audience?

2. Are they all eye doctors?

3. Why did they need this presentation?

4. What is the outcome of the presentation supposed to be?

5. Why were you asked to do this presentation? What do you bring that is unique?

Then, given that it is only 30 minutes and that there is probably a huge amount of expertise in the audience I might approach it this way:

1. I’ve given each of you a piece of paper. Working with a partner you have two minutes to draw an eyeball and label as many parts of it as possible. Begin. At the end of two minutes I would say, “familiarity doesn’t mean competence.”

2. Then, I would allow them two minutes to confer with those around them and add/subtract/correct anything they want to.

3. I would the use this as a springboard into pulling from them the anatomy starting from macro to micro, maybe with a large poster of the eye rather than a PowerPoint just to change it up.

One thing we constantly talk with our trainers about is having at least two ways to present each piece of content so that we are not dependent on technology.”

Bob Pike CSP, CPAE, CPLP Fellow, MPCT

Chairman Emeritus/Founder, The Bob Pike Group

Founder/Editor, The Creative Training Techniques Newsletter

Past Chairman of the Executive Board – Lead Like Jesus