Taking on the Unexpected

Many of us are being asked to do things that we don’t normally do. Maybe it is working from home while the dog barks at the mailman or coaching children through school while taking online meetings. If you are in the L&D space, you’ve probably been asked to convert a classroom session to in-person delivery, deliver a session via an online platform, or support others in your organization to deliver sessions online.

If you are like me, the request to help others have come in more frequently. Even RFP’s are asking that we build in coaching on their chosen tool to get the presenters comfortable with a session they’ll have to deliver. It’s a great idea! And it takes time. To help us address this hurdle we’ve started building guides for trainers that speak directly to the challenges of using these tools and maintaining what we know to be best practices for adult learning. The latest guide is the Trainer’s Guide to Microsoft Teams.

The Challenges of Microsoft Teams for Training

microsoft teams for training limitations

Microsoft Teams provides a couple of unique challenges. First, it didn’t start as a training platform but is part of an overall suite of tools. This has been challenging over the last few months for organizations that are expected to deliver training on the platform we’re already paying for. With the COVID-19 pandemic, Microsoft has invested heavily in upgrading the experience.

This is great, but it is also constantly changing and may look different at each organization. And there lies the second challenge. Microsoft Teams is changing. Next month when you deliver a session it may look different than it does today. Change can be good, but as facilitators, we want our energy to be focused on the learning experience and not the details of the tool.

Why Use the Trainer’s Guide to Microsoft Teams?

Microsoft Team's best practices for trainers

This is where the Trainer’s Guide to Microsoft Teams comes in. We needed this guide because our customer’s needed this guide. After we created it we decided we couldn’t hide it under a bushel. No! Our goal as a company is to help every professional design and deliver better training so we felt better sharing it far and wide.

Trainer’s Guides for Other Platforms

We hope the Trainer’s Guide to Microsoft Teams makes a difference in your training. We know that there are many platforms for virtual training. We’ve identified those most used by our customers and created free trainer’s guides to stay on top of the latest changes.

Be sure to sign up for the Train Like a Champion blog to get alerts when we make updates.

Trainer’s Guide to Zoom

Trainer’s Guide to GoToTraining

Build Training for Microsoft Teams in Soapbox

The Trainer’s Guide to Teams pairs well with a presentation designed for the features available in Microsoft Teams. Try a Soapbox demo or a free trial to see how Soapbox can make the transition to virtual training frighteningly easy!

5 thoughts on “Taking on the Unexpected

  1. I wish we would have had something like the Trainer’s Guide to Microsoft Teams when we
    started using the platform! We began using Teams over a year ago, before we had to transition to
    on-line training but during a time when our organization was moving away from Skype as a
    training platform. Our virtual presentations and training sessions often required a high-volume ofattendees from across the country, and Skype wasn’t able to support the volume or the bandwidthwe required. Our training team was the first to utilize Teams to train, and I helped to pilot our useof the Teams Live meeting space. I think the live meetings are incredible, as they allow you toproduce the entire meeting in a very seamless manner (if you know what your doing). I think themost important thing a new user can do to prepare if they are moving to a new presentationplatform is to spend hours playing with the platform to ensure they are comfortable with thecontrols and are able to troubleshoot in case they accidentally click somewhere unexpected. Mostof the Live meetings I have attended haven’t been as smooth, but people are getting much betterthe longer we use the service.

    I recently gave a standard Teams presentation, and I really do like how easy it is to share
    your screen and content with your audience. It may be common for a lot of people to use links
    within their presentation to access web content, but I have only recently started doing this as a wayto easily transition between PowerPoint and our content on SharePoint. Our entire company doeseverything through Microsoft, so it is wonderful that Microsoft gives us the ability to move
    between programs seamlessly. With the SharePoint links embedded in my PowerPoint, my
    transitions were short and flawless. I’m really enjoying using Teams to train, and I’m excited that
    Microsoft keeps updating the program as we all learn more about remote learning and training

  2. I wish we would have had something like the Trainer’s Guide to Microsoft Teams when we started using the platform! We began using Teams over a year ago, before we had to transition to on-line training but during a time when our organization was moving away from Skype as a training platform. Our virtual presentations and training sessions often required a high-volume of attendees from across the country, and Skype wasn’t able to support the volume or the bandwidth we required. Our training team was the first to utilize Teams to train, and I helped to pilot our use of the Teams Live meeting space. I think the live meetings are incredible, as they allow you to produce the entire meeting in a very seamless manner (if you know what your doing). I think the most important thing a new user can do to prepare if they are moving to a new presentation platform is to spend hours playing with the platform to ensure they are comfortable with the controls and are able to troubleshoot in case they accidentally click somewhere unexpected. Most of the Live meetings I have attended haven’t been as smooth, but people are getting much better the longer we use the service.
    I recently gave a standard Teams presentation, and I really do like how easy it is to share your screen and content with your audience. It may be common for a lot of people to use links within their presentation to access web content, but I have only recently started doing this as a way to easily transition between PowerPoint and our content on SharePoint. Our entire company does everything through Microsoft, so it is wonderful that Microsoft gives us the ability to move between programs seamlessly. With the SharePoint links embedded in my PowerPoint, my transitions were short and flawless. I’m really enjoying using Teams to train, and I’m excited that Microsoft keeps updating the program as we all learn more about remote learning and training.

  3. Thanks for putting this together. You are right that Teams is constantly changing making using it as a training tool challenging at times. We find polling in the chat box to be much more cumbersome than just 2-3 months ago.

    • I agree with Brian. A big part of us producing these is that we decided that we would stay on top of them. They are vital to the successful use of Soapbox and the rate of change on all of these tools is incredible. We also want to learn as much from people who are using individual tools. Hopefully, people will share their experiences here.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.